RSPB Geltsdale, New venture drift/Howgill colliery and Forest head lime works,Cumbria


New venture drift -wast tip

“Howgill Colliery – Another early Thompson project was the Howgill Colliery which was a drift connected to the Blacksyke Branch near Forest Head. Howgill was closed in 1880 but sections of it were worked many decades later to help boost the dwindling coal resources. In 1919 the Naworth Coal Company was again considering fresh mining activities closec to the old Howgill Colliery and the Venture drift was reopened beside the Gairs Branch south of Forest Head which entered the Howgill seam this was called the New Venture Drift. At its peak in 1923 it employed 46 below ground and 16 on the surface and finally closed in 1934”.
taken from http://www.cumbria-railways.co.uk/brampton_railway_mines.html

pipes from the mine -these are used to vent gases from tunnels

entrance to the drift mine -taken from the top of the drift entrance

we heard  water which sounded like it was from a  hollow tunnel -one of the other entrances to the drift mine!
railway cutting  to Gains colliery disused

a wall – look carefully a pipe !

a pipe to fill the water tank in the  steam trains ?

a water tank – pipe to the railway cutting  + valve found to control the water flow

a rainbow

capped mine shaft

mine waste tip

red lichen flower found on mine waste tip

forest head lime works,
very windy and wet on the ground

lime kilns

info about Lime Kiln’s

inside a lime kiln

mine ?

Railway loading bay

railway cutting disused

lime kiln waste

kirkhouse brick

RSPB Geltsdale -back at last
Weather: very wet ,windy high chill factor very strong winds which were very gusty visibility generally good  though, very tiring to be out and about on the high fells so we kept to the lowland parts , we will come back to this area.
Links to local area


Local places to shop


local photo
route
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One Response to “RSPB Geltsdale, New venture drift/Howgill colliery and Forest head lime works,Cumbria”

  1. That looked like a wet walk! But the lime kiln looks fascinating! I never would have known what that was. Now I do 😀

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